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Monthly Archives: April 2014

All That Glitters IS Gold

Apr 30 0 Comments

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Nowadays, all that glitters IS gold, and there’s a whole lot of gold to go around. Gold is one of those colors that is timelessly elegant, although we see it go through waves of popularity (early 80s, early 90s, early 00s) but I’m here to tell you that gold hasn’t gotten old and in fact its quite elegant and bold. There are certain gold pieces that are eternally chic, for example a gold watch or a gold pair of shoes. Pieces like that you should not only invest in but you should never get rid of. Trendier gold pieces tend to come in the form of dresses and jewelry, but although you may not keep them forever, right now especially is the time to invest in some gold for your dress. 

Cartier
When deciding upon what gold to invest in, you’ll want to factor in whether or not you want to buy real gold or faux gold. Most items on the market are fake, but when it comes to jewelry there is plenty of real gold out there – and it has quite the interesting history to it. Gold has been valuable and highly sought-after for coinage, jewelry, and other arts since long before the beginning of recorded history. The last gold certificate and gold coin currencies were issued in the U.S. in 1932. In Europe, most countries left the gold standard with the start of World War I in 1914 and, with huge war debts, did not return to gold as a medium of exchange. The value of gold is rooted in its medium rarity, easy handling, easy smelting, non-corrosiveness, distinct color and non-reactiveness to other elements; qualities most other metals lack. The world consumption of new gold produced is about 50% in jewelry, 40% in investments, and 10% in industry. Even in modern day culture we see gold associated with wealth, royalty, and achievement, with one example being that the highest held honor at the Olympic games is a gold medal. 


At the end of 2009, it was estimated that all the gold ever mined totaled 165,000 tones. At $1,600 per troy ounce, 165,000 metric tonnes of gold would have a value of $8.5 trillion. Since the 1880s, South Africa has been the main source for the world’s gold supply, with about 50% of all gold ever produced having come from South Africa. Production in 1970 accounted for 79% of the world supply, producing about 1,480 tonnes. In 2007 China (with 276 tonnes) overtook South Africa as the world’s largest gold producer, the first time since 1905 that South Africa has not been the largest supplier.


With all of the global gold phantasm flustering around, it’s no wonder that when the going gets tough, the tough get golding. It’s time for you to take a gander on the gold glam-tram and find some treasure for yourself!

Alexander McQueen

Alexander McQueen

Alexander McQueen

Amanda Wakeley

Anya Hindmarch

Badgley Mistake

Casadei

Chanel

Charlotte Olympia

Charlotte Olympia

Chloe

Dolce & Gabbana

Dolce & Gabbana

Dolce & Gabbana

Erdem

Fendi

Giuseppe Zanotti

Giuseppe Zanotti

Gucci

Gucci

Gucci

Herve Leger

L.K. Bennett

Michael Michael Kors

Miu Miu

Miu Miu

Nicholas Kirkwood

Patricia Al’kary

Penny Loves Kenny

Roberto Cavalli

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Saint Laurent

Saint Laurent

Saint Laurent

Saint Laurent

Saint Laurent

Swarovski

Versace Jeans

Zuhair Murad

Alexander McQueen

Alice Joseph

Balenciaga

Balmain

Balmain

Balmain

Balmain

Carvela

Chloe

Christian Louboutin

Christian Louboutin

Delias

Haider Ackermann

Issa

Jimmy Choo

Lanvin

Lanvin

Marchesa

Needle & Thread

Saint Laurent

Valentino

Get Your Ne-On!

Apr 30 0 Comments
Wearing neon is a no nonsense way to make noise, and I mean that in the best sense of the word. Neon clothes, shoes, and bags are super fun statement pieces that look particularly good when worn solo (don’t do neon shoes and a neon dress). Just a pop of color here or there is the perfect way to stand out in a crowd. Neon isn’t just a fashion statement, it also has a long scientific history belonging to it. Neon (Greek for “new”) is often used in signs and produces an unmistakable bright reddish-orange light. Although still referred to as “neon”, other colors are generated under neon lights through the use of different noble gasses or by varied colors of fluorescent lighting. Neon was discovered in 1898 by the British chemists Sir William Ramsay and Morris Travers in London, England. Neon was discovered when Ramsay chilled a sample of air until it became a liquid, then warmed the liquid and captured the gases as they boiled off. Today we have the ability to make synthetic neon not only in signage but more importantly (for us) in fabrics as well. Neon is not just “pretty,” but it’s also pretty practical. Often times joggers or bikers will wear neon colored clothing to prevent cars from mistaking them for shadows in the dark. 

Need some help putting a neon look together? You’re in luck – I’ve compiled four different “neon” outfits to help guide you down the right path.

Alexandra earrings
Jane Norman dress
Saint Laurent clutch
Jason Wu shoes

Chanel earrings
Madison dress
Chanel purse
Office shoes

Victorias Secret top
Topshop jeans
Oasis ring
Christian Louboutin bag
Saint Laurent shoes

Monki top
See by Chloe skirt
Saint Laurent clutch
Gabrianna sandals
Now go ahead, get your Ne-On!

Agent Provocateur

Alexis Bittar

Alexis Bittar

Cameo Rose

Cameo Rose

Dezso by Sara Beltran

Giambattista Valli

Helene Berman

Humble Chic

J Brand

J. Crew

Jil Sander

Jil Sander

Jimmy Choo

Jimmy Choo

Jimmy Choo

Jimmy Choo

Juicy Couture

Karen Millen

Kenzo

Kristin Perry

Lela Rose

Mara Hoffman

Mara Hoffman

Mara Hoffman

Matthew Williamson

Milly

Miu Miu

Prabal Gurung

Priviliged

Priviliged

Ribbon

Roksanda Ilincic

Saint Laurent

Saint Laurent

Saint Laurent

Shourouk

Shourouk

Sophia Webster

Sophia Webster

Sophia Webster

Tamara Mellon

Ted Baker

Tom Binns

Valentino

Valentino

Jimmy Choo

Harajuk-WHO?

Apr 28 0 Comments
Harajuku lovers have become a cultural phenomenon since the early 90s, but became increasingly so with the release of Gwen Stefani’s “Harajuku Lovers” tour in 2005. Girls (and women) from round the world flocked to the streets of Japan’s Meiji and Omotsesando streets just to get a glimpse at what an authentic Harajuku girl looked like (and how they could emulate them). Truth be told, however, Harajuku is not actually a style, it is merely a location. All of the pictures you see posted of “Harajuku girls” are actually teens dressed primarily in Oshare Kei and Decora fashion. So what exactly is Oshare Kei and Decora? 


Oshare Kei is a sub genre of another style culture called “Visual Kei.” Oshare Kei image is very different than the usual Visual Kei image. Visual Kei tends to be a whole lot darker with very striking makeup, while Oshare Kei is lighter and the clothes tend to be very colorful (you will often see people dressed in Lolita style clothes).Oshare kei is known as the happy-go-lucky version of Visual kei and is seen as the most fashionable and cutting edge of the styles. The style focuses a lot on mixing different patterns, bright colors and punk elements to create a unique look. Unlike Visual kei, the make-up is toned down a bit and focuses more on the eyes alone. Facial piercings are also common. Just like Visual kei, Oshare kei has been largely influenced by musical artists.

The Decora style originated in the late 90s/early 2000’s and rose to great popularity both in and outside Japan. The clothes are usually black and pink, but other neon colors are also deemed acceptable. A plain shirt and hoodie is often worn with short tutu-like skirts in the same color-way. The hair (often worn in low ponytails with long bangs) and make-up itself tends to be quite plain. However, the most significant part of decora is to pile on many layers of cute accessories until the bangs and shirt are barely visible. Stockings, legwarmers, armwarmers, and knee socks are also worn atop each other in different layers. Common details also include leopard prints and patterned dental masks. The style was eventually merged/replaced in the late 2000s by “fairy kei” and “OTT-Lolita” in Japan, though it is still a relatively popular style overseas.

In America we don’t commonly see people dressed head-to-toe in Decora or Oshare-Kei, but we often see trends borrowed from the two styles which in turn make up a brand new style, which we call, albeit in misappropriation, “Harajuku style.”  

Dressing in and borrowing from Harajuku style can be a whole lot of fun, and I would recommend ladies of any age give it a try. Be it a simple hair pin, or a pink skirt, playing dress up has taken on a whole new (and extraordinarily fun) meaning. Below I have compiled for you some of my favorite Decora and Oshare-Kei-inspired pieces available on the market, but please note – I would HIGHLY recommend (unless you’re visiting Japan) only wear one of these items at a time. Get into the Japanese jive; decorate 
yourself with Decora and share your style with Oshare-Kei!

Alice by Temperately

Bottega Veneta

Charlotte Olympia

Charlotte Olympia

Dolce & Gabbana

Dolce & Gabbana

Dolce & Gabbana

Dolce & Gabbana

Dorothy Perkins

Emanuel Ungaro

Emanuel Ungaro

Eugenia Kim

Fendi

Gianvito Rossi

J. Crew

Jil Sander

Kenzo

Kenzo

Lanvin

Lanvin

Linda Farrow

Markus Lupfer

Matthew Williamson

Miu Miu

Miu Miu

Miu Miu

Moschino

MSGM

Nicholas Kirkwood

Piers Atkinson

Pires Atkinson

Roksanda Illincic

Shourouk

Shourouk

Shourouk

Shourouk

Temperley London

Valentino

Valentino

Valentino

Alessandra Rich

Balmain

Balmain

Balmain

Betsey Johnson

Betsey Johnson

Christian Lacroix 
Christian Louboutin

Christian Dior

Fendi

Givenchy

Harajuku Lovers

Harajuku Lovers
Lanvin

Miu Miu

Miu Miu

Miu Miu

Prada

Ralph Lauren

Romwe
Romwe

Romwe

Rosantica

Saint Laurent

Saint Laurent

Swetc

Tarina Tarantino

Tarina Tarantino

Tarina Tarantino

Tarina Tarantino

Tokidoki

Valentino

Giambattista Valli

Saint Laurent

Peter Pilotto


Dot Dot Dash

Apr 24 0 Comments
Everyone loves a perfectly placed polka dot, and it often hearkens us back to a time of playfulness and whimsy; our youth-hood school days for example. Polka dots aren’t just for the young in body, they’re for the young at heart, too, and there’s a plethora of polka pinafore on the market today. 
Vintage Yves Saint Laurent
The word “polka” itself derives from the Polish for “Polish woman”—in Czech, it translates to “little woman or girl.” Polka dots are inherently diminutive, automatically feminine. The pattern itself shares its name with the popular polka dance form, leading one to believe that there is a connection linking the pattern to the dance. It’s possible that polka dots reflect the same regulated, short bursts of energy that inflect the polka itself. Regardless, we know that the American women’s magazine Godey’s Lady’s Book was the first to print the term, in an 1857 description of a “scarf of muslin, for light summer wear, surrounded by a scalloped edge, embroidered in rows of round polka dots.” However, the name was likely settled upon merely because of the dance’s popularity at the time the pattern became fashionable, just as many other products and fashions of the era also adopted the polka name.

Polka dancers
Polka dots became common in clothing in the late nineteenth century in the United Kingdom. It was there that we saw birthed the narrowly spaced apart black and white dot pattern. Traditionally, however, polka dots are used in the clothing of flamenco dancers and performers. In fashion, many people associate polka dots with Venezuelan fashion designer Carolina Herrera, who used polka dots on most of her dresses during the late 80s and early 90s. America’s love affair with the polka dot began, perhaps, in 1926, when Miss America was photographed in a polka dot swimsuit. Shortly after, in 1928, Disney introduced its cartoon darling Minnie Mouse wearing a red polka dot dress and matching bow. Throughout the 1930s, polka dot dresses appeared in stores nipped in by ribbons and accentuated with bows. 

Miss America 1926
Later in the decade, the polka dot accrued a highbrow style when fashion designer Christian Dior released his “New Look” collection of hourglass dresses, many styles bedecked with dots. After a wartime period of shifting gender roles, Dior told Vogue that his collection sought “to make women extravagantly, romantically, eyelash-battingly female” again.

Christian Dior

In 1951, Monroe was famously photographed wearing a polka dot bikini. Nine years later, the release of Brian Hyland’s hit song, “Itsy Bitsy Teenie Weenie Yellow Polka Dot Bikini,” brought polka dots back into vogue.

Marilyn Monroe
We are once again seeing polka dot patterns prance onto Paris’ streets and runways in a less than “spotty” way. Women of all ages are rocking the dot, and they’re sporting the spot in different colors, sizes, and garments. Divvy a moment from your day and dote on some delightfully dashing dots. 
Manolo Blahnik

Mango

Le Specs

Christian Louboutin

Miu Miu

Red Valentino

Sophia Webster

Sophie Hulme

Red Valentino

Rodebjer Julian

Stella McCartney

Shawlsmith

Sass & Bide

Precis

Oscar de la Renta

Oscar de la Renta

Oasis

Newlook

Markus Lupfer

Meadham Kirchoff

Newlook

Karl Lagerfeld

Izabel London

Giuseppe Zanotti

Giambattista Valli

Giambattista Valli

Emma Cook

Emanuel Ungaro

Emanuel Ungaro

Dot Dash

Dorothy Perkins

Dorothy Perkinks

Donna Karan

Dolce Vita
Christian Dior

Chloe

Charles David

Chanel

Belstaff

Agnona

Red Valentino

Michael Kors

Marni

Lulu & Co

Dolce & Gabbana

Dolce & Gabbana

Burberry

Totally Tortoiseshell

Apr 24 0 Comments
The term “tortoiseshell” itself is a misleading one. The substance we know as tortoiseshell has nothing at all to do with land of tortoises. Rather it is derived from the shells of certain species of sea turtles, notably the hawksbill. Therefore it would be more correct to refer to this material as turtle shell, or simply, shell. The hawksbill turtle is an endangered species largely because of its exploitation for the material. The large size, fine colour and unusual form of the hawksbill makes it especially suitable for the making of fine antiquities. Tortoiseshell was widely used from ancient times in the West and in Asia, until the trade was finally banned in the 1970s. It was used, normally in thin slices or pieces, in the manufacturing of a wide variety of items such as combs, small boxes and frames. Despite being expensive, tortoiseshell was attractive to manufacturers and consumers because of its beautiful mottled appearance, its durability, and its organic warmth against the skin.

A hawksbill shell
In 1973, the trade of tortoiseshell worldwide was banned under CITES (the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species). The material was already often imitated in stained horn, plastic and other materials, and this practice still continues. 

Alexander McQueen Tortoiseshell clutch
The material which we call tortoiseshell has long been prized for its ability to take a high polish, and its beautiful colouration. Characteristically this consists of a random mottling of translucent amber with darker tints of deep reddish brown. Shell can also be found that is not mottled, but an almost uniform dark brown. There are also rarer varieties which vary from pale yellow to a deep amber colour. These materials are known as blonde and demi blonde shell.

A “blonde” tortoiseshell bag
The typical colour variation produces a very exotic translucent and almost three dimensional effect when the material has been worked into one of the high Spanish style combs which were fashionable throughout the 19th and early 20th century. The larger of these ornaments were worn standing proud from the top of the head by anything upto 12 inches. This allowed the light to pass through the top or heading, and to show up the beauty and transparency of the pierced design, as well as of the material itself.

An nineteenth century Spanish comb
Tortoiseshell remains popular today and is oftentimes considered to be one of the most classic of wearable trends. You can most often find tortoiseshell in jewelry but it continues to adorn the handles of bags as well as the frames of sunglasses to name a couple instances.  

Baublebar

Baublebar

Baublebar

Baublebar

Baublebar

Lauren K Jewelry

Lisa August

Alexander McQueen

Alexander McQueen

Fornash

Heirloom Finds

Heirloom Finds

Heirloom Finds

Heirloom Finds

Linda Farrow

Max & Chloe

Miu Miu

Oliver Spencer

Reece Hudson

Stella McCartney

Swell Caroline Jewelry

Tory Burch

Block Party

Apr 23 0 Comments
Color blocking – who doesn’t want to come to the block party? A fun and fresh way to liven up your outfit, choosing pieces with color blocked patterns provide a novel approach to dressing, especially for this spring! So what exactly is color blocking? Color blocking is exactly just that, the blocking of colors. Sometimes it is done for the purpose of a pattern, sometimes it is done to highlight and/or negate certain body parts, other times it is completely arbitrary. Some rules to follow when buying into the block? 1) Clashing is smashing! The more your colors clash, the better (for once!) 2) Be brave and be bold! Bold colors are the wisest way to wear a color blocked pattern. 3) Accessorize don’t compromise! Wear a great pair of earrings with your color blocked sweater or a pop-out red colored shoe. 4) Three’s the charm! Stick to three accentuating colors max. Any more than that and you may end up looking like a rubix cube.
Preen

Alexander McQueen


Carven


Cedric Charlier


Christian Louboutin


Christian Louboutin


Duffy


Fendi


Fendi


Fendi


Herve Leger


Issa


Jonathan Simkhai


Josh Goot


Karl Lagerfeld


Kenzo


Kenzo


Lanvin


Marc by Marc Jacobs


Marni


Michael Kors


Missoni


Ostwald


Peter Pilotto


Pierre Hardy


Pierre Hardy


Pierre Hardy


Reed Krakoff


Roksanda Ilincic


Roland Mouret


Roland Mouret


Saint Laurent


Sophia Webster


Stella McCartney


Stella McCartney


Temperley London


Tibi


Versace


Victoria Beckham


Victoria Beckham

How to Dress Like Kate Moss

Apr 19 0 Comments
What would a style blog be if it weren’t to include one of the most ultimate style icons of all time? Who am I talking about? Kate Moss, but of course! Ms. Moss is indisputably a visual reference for some of the greatest fashion moments the past two decades have ever seen. 


Born in Croydon, Moss was discovered in 1988 at the age of 14 by Sarah Doukas, the founder of Storm Model Management, at JFK Airport in New York City. Moss rose to fame in the early 1990s as part of the heroin chic fashion trend. She is known for her waifish figure, and above all, her impeccable taste. Moss has starred in variety of campaigns for designers including Gucci, Dolce & Gabbana, Calvin Klein, Chanel, and Rimmel. In 2007, Time Magazine named Moss one of the top 100 most influential people in the world. Along with modeling, Moss has also designed collections for Topshop and Longchamp. Moss is indisputably a role model for many young women, and with that in mind, it only seems appropriate to pay homage to this heroine by compiling a series of “Moss looks” and solutions to dressing accordingly. I now present you with, “ten ways to dress like Kate Moss.”

1. Versace for H & M
2. Addornments Boutique
3. Eve’s Addiction
4. Rebecca Minkoff

5. Saint Laurent
6. H & M
7. Saint Laurent
8. Rebecca Minkoff 
9. Kate Moss for Topshop
10. Roger Vivier
11. Ritani
12. Manolo Blahnik

13. Balmain
14. J Brand
15. Tom Ford
16. BCBGeneration
17. Fendi

18. Philipp Plein
19. Hunter
20. G by Guess
21. Saint Laurent

22. Roberto Cavalli
23. Casadei
24. Laura Verano
25. Lauren K Jewelry

26. Kate Moss for Topshop
27. Anna Hu
28. The Hellers

29. Sheinside
30. Aeropostale
31. DC

32. H & M
33. River Island
34. Givenchy
35. Hermes
36. Manolo Blahnik

37. J Brand
38. Jimmy Choo
39. Helmut Lang
40. Celine
41. L. L. Bean
42. Shannon
43. Ray Ban

Skirting the Issue

Apr 18 0 Comments
Skirts, they’re perfect year round whether you wear them with tights or you go bare-legged. Skirts have been around for centuries, and consistently remained in style. 

Gucci
In the western world, skirts are usually considered to be women’s clothing, however, there are exceptions. The kilt is a traditional men’s garment in Ireland and Scotland, and some fashion designers, such as Jean-Paul Gaultier, have shown men’s skirts on the runway. 

Jean-Paul Gaultier
The hemline of a skirt varies according to the personal taste of the wearer which can be influenced by such factors as social context, modern fashion, and cultural conceptions of modesty. Some medieval upper-class women wore skirts over three metres in diameter at the bottom. At the other extreme, the miniskirts of the 1960s were minimal garments that may have barely covered the underwear when seated. Nowadays, you can find women wearing skirts of lengths pretty much everywhere in between. 


The great thing about a skirt is once you’ve bought it you can dress it up by pairing it with, say, a cardigan and pearls, or dress it down by wearing it with a tank top and flip flops. Skirts, of note, are also often times considerably more comfortable to wear then thigh-hugging pants – particularly the modernly popular skinny jean that we so commonly see worn.

Louis Vuitton
Don’t skirt the issue – get out and wear a skirt today!

1. Oh My Love
2. Topshop
3. Ringmaster
4. Dolce & Gabbana
5. Herpanache
6. Alexander McQueen
7. Nina Ricci
8. Dolce & Gabbana
9. Prabal Gurung
10. Helmut Lang
11. Peter Pilotto
12. Monki

13. Balmain
14. Forever Unique
15. Ringmaster
16. Carven
17. Newlook
18. Love Haus
19. Markus Lupfer
20. Balmain
21. Deneen
22. Ted Baker
23. Nicole Miller
24. Kenzo

25. J. Crew
26. Marc Jacobs
27. Saint Laurent
28. Pull & Bear
29. Boohoo
30. Jane Norman
31. Boohoo
32. Maison Rabih Kayrouz
33. Parker Sabrina
34. H & M
35. Lanvin
36. Boohoo


Animal Kingdom

Apr 15 0 Comments
Animal prints are the perfect way to punctuate any outfit of yours. A splash of cheetah here, a hint of zebra there, taking cues from the animal kingdom can add a breath of modernity and sophistication to your look. You do, however, need to be moderately wary of your outfit turning into a zoo, so be careful not to mix animals at one time (the same rules that apply in the jungle apply in the metropolitan jungle too). It should also be of note that it’s important to at the very least be sensitive to the clauses of PETA, so if you do choose to wear real animal skin, make sure you’re not wearing an endangered species. 


Animal print attire doesn’t necessarily have to come from a skinned animal – there are loads and loads of beautiful synthetic and replicated versions adorning everything from shoes to dresses. The other great thing about wearing animal print is that it is multi-seasonal; you can buy a giraffe print bag in the spring and still wear it again in the winter. 

Dooney and Bourse
Since as old as time, mankind has been garnishing themselves in animal prints. From African tribes that used paints to mark their faces as leopards to English kings who have used the skins of tigers as rugs to denote their sign of status – all across the world animals and animal prints have been long a favored pattern. And let’s not forgot what is undeniably the most popular use of animal, which would be the eponymous fur coat. Fur is one of the oldest forms of clothing; thought to have been widely used as hominids first expanded outside of Africa. Fur is generally thought to have been among the first materials used for clothing and bodily decoration. The exact date when fur was first used in clothing is still debated. It is known that several species of hominoids used fur clothing. Fur is still worn in most mild and cool climates around the world due to its superior warmth and durability, however, the invention of inexpensive synthetic textiles for insulating clothing has led to fur clothing falling out of fashion. Despite all that, fur is still used by indigenous people and developed societies, due to its availability and superior insulation properties. The Inuit peoples of the Arctic relied on fur for most of their clothing, and it also forms a part of traditional Russian, Japanese, and Scandinavian clothing. Fur is also sometimes associated with glamour and lavish spending. A number of consumers and designers—notably British fashion designer and outspoken animal rights activist Stella McCartney —reject fur due to moral beliefs and perceived cruelty to animals. 


Don’t FURget about looking fabulous and adorn yourself in animal print!

Chanel

Fendi

Gucci

J. Mendel

Just Cavalli

McQ by Alexander McQueen

Temeperley London

W Collection

Aftershock

Alaia

Boutique 9

Camilla

Christian Louboutin

Diane Von Furstenberg

Diane Von Furstenberg

Ermanno Scervino

Juicy Couture

Lanvin

Manolo Blahnik

Manolo Blahnik

McQ by Alexander McQueen

Michael Kors

Moncler

Nicole Miller

River Island

Salvatore Ferragamo

Stella McCartney

Tory Burch

Versus

Saint Laurent
Pepe Jeans


Become a Member of the Band

Apr 11 0 Comments
We all have heads, so why not decorate them? Headbands are a splendiferous way to enhance your overall look. From simple corded designs to intricately beaded masterpieces, the headband is a surefire way to get people to turn their heads and take a look at you. Simpler narrower designs are best for daytime looks and thicker more intricate designs will top off your evening attire. Be wary, however, with how much other jewelry you decide to wear. Since the headband is so prominent on your face, it’s best to stick with a simpler earring or no earrings at all – and likewise with a necklace. Both practical and utilitarian, the headband can be worn with either an up-do or with your hair all the way down. With smaller corded headbands you may also want to try experimenting with the placement of your headband – i.e. wear it midway on your forehead or wear it right at the crown of your head. 


The beginning of headbands started no later than the ancient Greeks, around 475 BC to 330 BC, who wore hair wreaths. The Greeks and Romans wore these pieces for very special occasions or an important event. Cultures such as the Etruscans and Romans started to decorate their wreaths with jewels made up of gold and silver. 


In the early 20th century, wide headbands known as headache bands were very popular accessories in women’s fashion. Their name, of course, results from the belief that the tight pressure they provided around the forehead could relieve or prevent headaches. The French called such a garment a bandeau (bandeaux, plural). In the 1910s, headache bands would likely have been more lacy in design—a crochet central panel decorated with ribbons and rosettes and bordered with lace, for example. Examples from the 1920s and 1930s are more apt to be dramatic sheaths in exotic fabrics and decorated with feathers, and would have been worn with fashions by couturiers such as Paul Poiret. These sorts of headache bands probably achieved their peak of popularity in the 1920s.


And now, I present to you, some of my favorite headbands available on the market. Head out and get one today!

Anthropologie

Ben Amun
Cara

Colette Malouf

Colette Malouf

Dauphines of New York

Dauphines of New York

Deepa Gurnani

Deepa Gurnani

Deepa Gurnani

Dolce & Gabbana

Dolce & Gabbana

Erickson Beamon

Eugenia Kim

Eugenia Kim

Henri Bendel

Jenny Packham

Joomi Lim

Lelet NY

Lelet NY

Louis Marette

Marni

Marni

Masterpeace

Masterpeace

Masterpeace

Masterpeace

Missoni

Namrata Joshipura

Emilio Pucci

River Island

Tasha

Tasha

Tasha

Vicki Sarge

Young & Beautiful

Young & Beautiful

Young & Beautiful


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